Let’s help make albinos feel at home
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Editorial
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THE hunting down and killing of people living with albinism that rocked this country some years ago has declined, with few rare isolated cases being recorded.

It is unfortunate, however, that albinos do not feel safe, especially in rural areas where most of these attacks occurred. This is so because the root causes that led to violence against them are still there, inducing fear that they can be spark plugs for fresh attacks.

A UN Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism, Ms Ikonwosa Ero, was in the country for an 11-day visit that saw her visiting a number of areas such as Dodoma, Shinyanga, Mwanza, Kasulu, Kigoma and Dar es Salaam.

She revealed that people with albinism continue to live in a very fragile situation as the root cause of the attacks against them remain rampant and the effects of over a decade of violations have taken their toll.

She also went on to say that more work must be done to address witchcraft and sensitise community members on the importance of protecting people with albinism instead harassing, killing or raping them. This advice comes in handy and if embraced, will go a long way in making these people feel safe in their motherland.

It is not good for people living with albinism to feel like they are prisoners of some sort, who are not free to mix and mingle and do their business without fear of being attacked.

It is true that they have lost trust, especially with the presence of traditional healers in their areas and there is need for awareness campaigns for this to end.

The government has gone a long way in cutting the tails of traditional healers, who were said to be involved in the killings as people seeking fortune and wealth consulted them for advice.

Though the government has succeeded in putting measures to protect people with albinism, society play a pivotal role in curbing such incidences. They are supposed to be on the forefront in protecting their fellow villagers and citizens.

What pained most in cases of albino attacks is that relatives were implicated as the main players behind killings.

There is need for relatives and society as a whole to be involved in the protection of these people and create an environment that they are loved and safe. It is torture for a person to live a life full of uncertainties.

Let everyone play his or her role to protect albinos and make sure they feel at home on their mother soil.

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